Wildlife Removal Services for Lakeland, FL

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Contact us in Lakeland, FL for Wildlife Removal ServicesDr. Critter has local service teams right here in Lakeland, FL to personally handle your wildlife problem.

Here at Dr. Critter, we offer unique programs specifically designed for rats, bats, and snakes.

We also offer humane removal of:

Your local Dr. Critter technician will resolve your animal problems humanely, using proven techniques that are safe for your family and pets. Our commitment to provide quality, affordable services makes us the best choice for homeowners, property managers, businesses, and governments.

What our customers say about us...

A technician from your company recently addressed a squirrel problem at our house. He trapped the squirrels for later release, sealed the attic, etc. The technician was competent and professional in his work. He was always friendly and caring and was helpful in his responses to my calls.
- Bill T., Tampa, FL

 

Lakeland, FL Wildlife Removal Service Areas

About Lakeland



Lakeland is a city in Polk County, Florida, along Interstate 4 east of Tampa. The westernmost city in Polk County, it is part of the Tampa Bay Area. According to the 2013 U.S. Census Bureau estimate, the city had a population of 100,710. Lakeland is a principal city of the LakelandWinter Haven Metropolitan Statistical Area (coterminous with Polk County), which had an estimated population of 623,009 in July 2013 based on data from the University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research. It is twinned with Richmond Hill, Ontario; Imabari, Ehime, Japan; Bli, Moldova; Portmore, Jamaica; and Chongming County, Shanghai, China through the Lakeland chapter of Sister Cities International.

Native Americans began to live in the area 12,000 years ago. European-American settlers arrived in Lakeland from South Carolina in the 1870s. The city expanded in the 1880s with the arrival of rail service, with the first freedmen railway workers settling here in 1883. They and European immigrants also came because of new jobs in the large phosphate industry that developed. Lakeland is home to the 1,267-acre Circle B Bar Reserve.

The first Paleo-Indians reached the central Florida area near the end of the last ice age, as they followed big game south.[23][24] As the ice melted and sea levels rose, these Native Americans ended up staying and thrived on the peninsula for thousands of years. By the time the first Spanish conquistadors arrived, more than 250,000 Native Americans were living on the peninsula.[citation needed] Some of these first early tribes were the Tocobago, Timucua, and Calusa. In 1527, a Spanish map showed a settlement near the Rio de la Paz.[23][24] The arrival of the Spanish turned out to be disastrous to these Native American tribes. Within 150 years, the majority of the pre-Columbian Native American peoples of Florida had been wiped out. Those who had not succumbed to diseases such as smallpox or yellow fever were either killed or enslaved.[23][24][25][26] Little is left of these first Native Americans cultures in Polk County except for scant archaeological records, including a few personal artifacts and shell mounds. Eventually, the remnants of these tribes merged with the Creek Indians who had arrived from the north and became the Seminole Indian tribe.[24][26]
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